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Vaccine Registration and Eligibility

Everyone living in British Columbia is eligible for vaccination. Find out how to register get a first, second or booster dose.

Last updated: January 13, 2022

Eligibility

All people living in British Columbia who are 5 years and older are eligible to get a vaccine. Find more information for:

Children ages 5 to 11

Health Canada has authorized the Pfizer vaccine for use in children ages 5 to 11. 

Register your child with Get Vaccinated. Once you've registered, you'll be invited to book an appointment. 

Learn more about vaccines and children.

Province of BC information on vaccines for children 5 to 11

Booster doses

If you haven't received your first or second dose yet, see how you can get vaccinated.

A booster dose is an additional COVID-19 vaccine you may get months after your initial vaccine series to boost protection against infection that may have waned over time. A booster gets immunity back up to a desirable level of protection for an extended period of time. 

The COVID-19 vaccines are very effective and provide good, ongoing protection especially against severe disease – which is the primary goal of the vaccination program. Here in BC, the longer interval between vaccine doses has been very helpful in supporting long lasting vaccine effectiveness.

However, because vaccines are not 100% effective against symptomatic infection, breakthrough infections among fully vaccinated individuals will happen. The vast majority of these are expected to be mild. Hospitalizations for COVID-19 among fully vaccinated individuals are rare. 

There is some evidence that the level of protection against symptomatic infection decreases over time after the initial vaccination series, especially for people who got their two COVID-19 vaccines less than 5 weeks apart, those with immunocompromising conditions, and among older individuals.

Additionally, people in long term care and assisted living facilities and in areas of high transmission are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection and will also benefit from a booster dose. 

You will get an invitation about 6 months after the date of your second dose. You must be invited to book a booster dose appointment. You can't drop-in at a clinic or call a pharmacy to get a booster.


Your original vaccine doses continue to provide good protection, especially against severe disease, while you wait to get a booster shot.

Everyone aged 18 and older who received dose 1 and 2, and who wants a booster, will receive a booster. You will get an invitation to book a booster appointment about 6 months after the date of your second dose. 


People who are pregnant

Pregnant people 18 years and older can get a booster dose 8 weeks after their second dose. You can be at any stage of your pregnancy.


If you haven't received an invite yet, call 1-833-838-2323 and self-identify as pregnant.


Learn more about booster doses at gov.bc.ca/booster

You will receive an invitation to book a booster dose appointment about 6 months after the date of your second dose. To get your booking invitation, make sure you are registered with the Get Vaccinated system and your immunization record is up-to-date. 


You will be able to book an appointment at a vaccine clinic or pharmacy. You can do this online or by phone. You can't drop-in at a clinic or call a pharmacy to get a booster.


Some people may also get a booster at a community clinic or where they receive care:
  • People who live in rural or remote Indigenous communities can get a booster dose in your community from your local health authority
  • People receiving care will get a booster from a health care worker who visits you if you live in an independent living facility or receive long-term home support

Learn more about booking your appointment.

Third doses

A third dose of COVID-19 vaccine is recommended for some people who are moderate to severely immunocompromised.

A third dose of COVID-19 vaccine is recommended for some people with compromised immune systems. Some people do not develop a strong immune response from two doses of vaccine because of the use of certain medications and treatments, as well as some health conditions.

For this group, it takes an additional dose to have a reasonable level of immunity and protection against COVID-19. Studies show that giving a third dose to complete the initial vaccine series can help individuals with compromised immune systems creates a stronger immune response to protect them from COVID-19. Individuals in this group will be invited through the provincial Get Vaccinated system to get a third dose of vaccine.

If available, the Moderna vaccine is recommended for third doses for people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised as it may help the individual develop a slightly stronger immune response compared to Pfizer. If Moderna is not available at the clinic, the Pfizer vaccine will be administered which also provides an effective increase in immune response.

This recommendation aligns with the recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization.
People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should receive a third dose of vaccine. The group includes:

Solid organ transplant and taking immunosuppressive therapy
  • People who have had a solid organ transplant. May include a heart, lung, liver, kidney, pancreas or islet cells, bowel or combination organ transplant.
Treatment for solid tumour or malignant hematologic conditions
  • People who have received an anti-CD20 drug for a malignant condition since January 2020.
  • People who are receiving or received systemic therapy (including chemotherapy, molecular therapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapies including CAR-T, monoclonal antibodies, hormonal therapy for cancer) in March 2020 or later. This includes solid tumours as well as hematologic cancers within this time period.
  • People who are receiving or received radiation therapy for cancer in October 2020 or later.
Bone marrow or stem cell transplant
  • People who had bone marrow or stem cell transplant in September 2019 or later, or are still taking immunosuppressant medications related to transplant.
Moderate to severe primary immunodeficiency
  • People with combined immune deficiencies affecting T-cells, immune dysregulation (particularly familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis) or those with type 1 interferon defects (caused by a genetic primary immunodeficiency disorder or secondary to anti-interferon autoantibodies).
  • People with moderate to severe primary immunodeficiency which has been diagnosed by an adult or pediatric immunologist and requires ongoing immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IVIG or SCIG) or the primary immunodeficiency has a confirmed genetic cause (e.g. DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome).
Prior AIDS defining illness or Prior CD4 count ≤ 200/mm3 or Prior CD4 fraction ≤ 15% or any detectable plasma viral load since January 2021 or HIV infection and ≥ 65 years old or perinatally acquired HIV infection.

Active treatment with the following immunosuppressive therapies:
  • People who received treatment since January 2020 with any anti-CD20 agents (such as rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab,  obinutuzumab, ibritumomab, tositumomab).
  • People who have been treated since January 2020 with b-cell depleting agents (such as epratuzumab, MEDI-551, belimumab, BR3-Fc, AMG-623, Atacicept, anti-BR3, alemtuzumab).
  • People who have been treated with biologics since December 15, 2020: abatacept, adalimumab, anakinra, benralizumab, brodalumab, canakinumab, certolizumab, dupilumab, etanercept, golimumab, guselkumab, infliximab, interferon products (alpha, beta, and pegylated forms), ixekizumab, mepolizumab, natalizumab, omalizumab, resilizumab, risankizumab, sarilumab, secukinumab, tildrakizumab, tocilizumab, ustekinumab, or vedolizumab.
  • People who have been treated with oral immune-suppressing drugs since December 15, 2020: azathioprine, baricitinib, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, leflunomide, dimethyl fumerate, everolimus, fingolimod, mycophenolate, siponimod, sirolimus, tacrolimus, tofacitinib, upadacitinib, methotrexate, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, or teriflunomide.
  • People who have been treated with steroids orally or by injection on an ongoing basis since December 15, 2020: dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone, or prednisone.
  • People who have been treated with immune-suppressing Infusions/injections since December 15, 2020: cladribine, cyclophosphamide, glatiramer, methotrexate.
Dialysis and/or with severe kidney or renal disease
  • People on dialysis (hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) or have stage 5 chronic kidney disease (eGFR <15ml/min) or have glomerulonephritis and receiving steroid treatment
You will receive an invitation by text, email, or phone call through the Get Vaccinated system about how and when to book a third dose. 

You must wait at least four weeks after your second dose to get your third dose. 

People who are not eligible and who did not receive an invitation through the Get Vaccinated system will not be able to get a third dose. 

If you believe you meet the criteria to get a third dose and have not been contacted, get in touch with your health care provider. Your health care provider can complete the attestation form, available through the Doctors of BC portal, to confirm your eligibility for a third dose. Once you have a signed attestation form, you can bring it with you to a walk-in vaccine clinic. You will not be able to book an appointment online.

You do not need a third dose to be considered fully vaccinated on your BC Vaccine Card.

Learn more about third doses for people severely immunocompromised.

Third dose vs. booster dose

A third dose is not the same as a booster. For people who do not develop the same immune response to the first two doses of the vaccine, a third dose is needed to get a similar level of protection as others in the population. For these people, receiving a third dose to complete the initial vaccine series can help individuals create antibodies to protect them from COVID-19.

A booster dose is an additional vaccine you may get later if the protection from the initial two-dose vaccine series begins to decrease over time. A booster gets immunity back up to a desirable level of protection for an extended period of time. 

Register vaccines received outside of B.C.

If you got one or two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine in another province, you must submit proof of an official vaccination record. It will be entered into the Provincial Immunization Registry.


If you received one or two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine in another country:
  1. Register with the Get Vaccinated system.
  2. Submit a proof of your COVID-19 immunization record.

Even if you have been vaccinated against COVID-19 outside of Canada you may still need to receive vaccinations here. B.C. is following the World Health Organization’s (WHO) approved COVID-19 vaccines list to decide whether or not it is recommended that you receive additional COVID-19 vaccination here.


List of WHO approved COVID-19 vaccines:
  • Pfizer/ BioNTech
  • Moderna
  • AstraZeneca
  • COVISHIELD
  • Janssen (Johnson & Johnson)
  • SinoPharm (Beijing) / Covilo / BBIBP-CorV 
  • Sinovac/ CoronaVac
  • COVAXIN
  • Covovax
If you received a single dose of the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine or if you received two doses of any of the other vaccines listed, you do not need any further doses, but you should submit your COVID-19 vaccine record in B.C.’s immunization record system. 

If you received a single dose of any of the vaccines listed, except Janssen (Johnson & Johnson), you are recommended to get a second COVID-19 vaccine dose in BC to complete your series. You should submit your COVID-19 vaccine record in B.C.’s immunization record system and register in B.C.’s vaccine registration system. You will be notified when you can get your second dose.

If you have received a vaccine that is not listed above, you should register in BC's vaccine registration system to receive a total of two doses of COVID-19 vaccine in BC.

How to register:
  1. Online at gov.bc.ca/getvaccinated, available in 12 different languages.
  2. By telephone through a provincial call centre (toll-free) at 1-833-838-2323, available in 140 different languages.

COVID-19 vaccines are available free of charge in BC to anyone who is 12 years of age or older regardless of immigration status.


For information on entering Canada and how your vaccination history may impact your entry requirements check the government’s current travel guidance.

International students should check with their educational institution’s website for campus policies and requirements as well as information on local testing and vaccination clinics.


First and second doses

Register with Get Vaccinated to book a vaccine appointment and receive an invitation when you are eligible to get another dose. Register:
  • Online at gov.bc.ca/getvaccinated, available in 12 different languages
  • By telephone through a provincial call centre (toll-free) at 1-833-838-2323, available in 140 different languages.
  • In-person at all Service BC offices. You will need to have a personal health number. Find a Service BC office.
If you don't have a Personal Health Number, you need to register by phone by calling 1-833-838-2323. A Personal Health Number will be created for you. 

First dose

Find drop-in clinics for 1st dose COVID-19 vaccinations in your health authority:

If you've registered with Get Vaccinated, you will receive an invitation to book an appointment. If you have questions or aren't sure if you are registered, phone the call centre at 1-833-838-2323.


Second doses

If you've registered with Get Vaccinated, you will receive an invitation to book a second doses approximately 56 days (8 weeks) after your first dose. You can select a location, date and time.


If you received AstraZeneca for your first dose, your local health authority will contact you to book an appointment for a second dose of the same vaccine.


For further information on how to book a second dose, visit Get Your Second Vaccine Dose.


The vaccines available in B.C. include:

  • Pfizer Comirnaty mRNA vaccine
  • Moderna Spikevax mRNA vaccine
  • AstraZeneca Vaxzevria viral vector vaccine
  • Janssen (owned by Johnson & Johnson) viral vector vaccine
The vaccine you get is based on a variety of factors including your age, allergies to vaccine ingredients, where you’re getting your vaccine, and availability of the products.

The COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are available at immunization clinics across the province, as well as participating pharmacies. 

A limited supply of AstraZeneca vaccine will soon be available. You can go on a waiting list to get AstraZeneca for dose 1 or 2. Call 1-833-838-2323 to be put on the waiting list.

There is a small amount of the Janssen vaccine in B.C. available for specific groups. It is not widely available. If this is the vaccine you want, please call 1-833-838-2323 and inform the agent that your preference is to receive the Janssen vaccine and you can be added to a wait list for this vaccine.




















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